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One of the emotional intelligence skills that consistently has an impact on careers in general and more specifically, on leadership careers, is Impulse control. It's a skill that contributes greatly to the way in individual makes decisions and is acknowledged as being one of the prime contributors to career (and leadership) derailment. We've all known someone that has hit "reply to all" and sent an ill timed and angry worded email.

Impulse control is your ability to think before acting and to show restraint in the face of impulses and the various temptations to act. Having the ability to remain focused, delay temptation, and avoid making rash decisions will ensure that you remain at low risk of derailment. This skill requires flexibility, the ability to reflect before you speak (or act) and patience when communicating with others.


 
 
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A month ago I posted an article that included some strategies for engaging and retaining Millennial talent. You can read the full article here. Born between 1982 and 2002, these members of the workforce, and those from Generation Y, are the business leaders of the very near future. Recent research from Gallup indicates that they're the least engaged members of the workforce and now research from Penna shows a distinct mismatch between what their bosses think they want from their future and what is actually important to them. 

Steven Ross, Head of Career Development at Penna says: “Simply guessing what will engage a Gen Y employee, or any employee for that matter, won’t work. Organisations that fail to do so could see a decline in engagement levels, and productivity, and increased attrition rates – not to mention a serious shortfall of managers and leaders in ten years’ time.”


 
 
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Far too many hiring decisions are based on what's found in the resumé (education and experience) along with a favourable first impression. Believe it or not, in many cases the decision to hire has been made within the first 10 milliseconds of meeting a candidate. The interview is conducted only to confirm that the right decision was made in the time that it took us to blink our eyes.

I’m a huge proponent of using assessments to help match candidates to specific roles. Do that, and your chances of finding and retaining great talent go up significantly. There are plenty of great assessments available. If you’d like to learn more about the assessments I recommend to my clients you can find them here. This article is about helping you to pull more useful information from a candidate. One thing I know from experience, hiring managers hate interviewing! As a result, not many of them are very good at it. Bear in mind that hiring decisions based on unstructured interviews are statistically no better than a coin toss! My guess is that you wouldn’t make any other meaningful business decision if the odds were so low.


 
 
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New research authored by Dr. Tara White suggests that there are two different types of extroverts – “agentic” and “affiliative” – each with distinct brain structures. Her findings confirms what the behavioural sciences have long known to be the case. According to Dr. White, agentic extroverts are “go-getters”: the kind of outgoing people who are persistent, assertive and focused on achievement. Affiliative extroverts tend to be more affectionate, friendly and sociable. 

The study, published in the journal Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Neuroscience (Grodin & White, 2015), determined that both types of extroverts had more gray matter in the medial orbitofrontal cortex. This area of the brain has been linked to making decisions based on rewards. Agentic extroverts, though, had larger volumes in some other areas as well. These were related to learning and memory for reward, cognitive control of behaviours and planning and execution. The study can’t tell us whether these areas are the cause of the personality differences or the result of them, or perhaps some combination of the two.